Kategorieë
arrest attorney public warning

Public warning

Public warning

BEWARE OF THIS ATTORNEY: MS SHAIK, NIRVANA, POLOKWANE

SHAIK MS

FOUND IN POSSESSION OF STOLEN TITLE DEED                                                                          IN CONTEMPT OF HIGH COURT ORDER TO RETURN SAME TO THE OWNER

Linkedin profile: Mohamed Salim Shaik

Senior Attorney at M S Shaik Inc

M S SHAIK Inc

Polokwane Area, South Africa

 

Magistrate to face criminal charges

 

Now practising as attorney Shaik

Various cases of theft/fraud under investigation

CAS 673/09/2015 SAPS POLOKWANE

CAS 484/11/2017

LATEST CAS 50/02/2018 SAPS SILVERTON

 

Forged signatures and fraud alleged as Hawks and NPA probe disputed will. 

The late Akbar Ali Ayob was a respected accountant and business advisor in Polokwane, the sort of man one would expect to leave his affairs in impeccable order. But his sudden death from a heartattack on 4 July 2013 triggered a bitter court battle over his estate which continues to this day – in the process, putting the reputations of several pillars of the local establishment on the line.

Contenders for the estate are, on one hand, his life-partner of 30 years Hilda Watkins and their three children (two at university, the youngest in matric) and on the other, are the deceased’s brother and sister, Mohamed and Halima Ayob. Mohamed is the imam of a local mosque; Hilda is a shop assistant working at one of the businesses owned by Akbar.

Although Ayob and his family lived a frugal and simple lifestyle, Hilda and the three children were well taken care of and the children received a good education. During his career as an accountant, Ayob accumulated a considerable fortune through a number of astute business ventures and investments in shares, unit trusts and properties. The exact value of the estate has yet to be disclosed due to the pending civil and criminal cases but is expected to amount to several million rand.

 

Magistrate to face criminal charges

Police confirmed that a case of fraud and misrepresentation of forged documents, allegedly involving a local magistrate, is being investigated. The magistrate recently presided over the bail application in a murder case which has sent shockwaves through the city.
The magistrate, who cannot be named as he has not officially been charged nor appeared in court, was allegedly involved in the fraudulent undersigning of a last will and testament of a local businessman who died in July 2013.
A relative of the deceased who presented Polokwane Observer with documentation last week confirmed that the family has opened a case of fraud at the Polokwane Police Station after a handwriting expert in the South African Police Service classified the signature on the testament to have been forged and a High Court ordered that the testament be declared null and void. The magistrate was allegedly appointed in 2013 as executor of the will which named the deceased’s brother and sister as only beneficiaries.
Other family members disputed the validity of the testament and approached the courts demanding that it be declared null and void with costs to the respondents in the case.
The complainants also approached a handwriting expert who was furnished with a copy of the testament allegedly signed by the deceased on 29 June 2013 six days before his death. In his report the expert stated that he also received specimen signatures of the deceased from the family in the form of hospital receipts, a college registration contract, security job card, security agreement and bank documents originally signed by the deceased.
“The will contains two disputed signatures of the testator. The original will was examined by me on 27 September 2013. I was requested to examine the disputed signatures of the deceased on the will and compare it with the known specimen,” the report stated.
In the opinion of the handwriting expert and based on all the discovered factual physical evidence he reported: “I reached a qualified and conclusive opinion. The disputed signatures of the deceased on the will respectively were in fact not created (beyond any reasonable doubt) by the author of the specimen signatures and are therefore all classified as forgeries.”
After the matter came before court on several occasions and the court heard the handwriting expert’s evidence, the Gauteng High Court in Pretoria ruled that the testament be suspended on 16 February this year which then left the family with no choice but to open a case of fraud against the magistrate.
Polokwane Police Head of Communications, Ntobeng Phala confirmed that the case of fraud and misrepresentation of forged documents is under investigation. “The investigating officer is still obtaining statements from involved parties. As soon as the investigation is complete, the docket will be sent to the Director of Public Prosecutions for a decision,” he said.

 

 

Kategorieë
trust

Trust

Trust

“My wife and I are discussing providing for the creation of a testamentary trust in our will to take care of our minor children upon our untimely death. I’m worried though that if we establish a trust, it may be too rigid to deal with the changing circumstances of our children. Can the trust be changed after our death should it be necessary to do so?”

A testamentary trust or trust mortis causa is established in a will and comes into effect upon the death of the testator (founder) of the will. Such trusts are typically used to protect the interests of minors or dependants who are unable to take care of themselves. Some or all of the assets in the estate are upon the death of the testator moved to the trust which is administered by trustees on behalf of the beneficiaries. A testamentary trust often terminates at a pre-determined time or event, for example when the beneficiaries reach a certain age.

As a rule of thumb the terms of a testamentary trust cannot be amended. The Trust Property Control Act 57 of 1988 (“the Act”) does grant our Courts the power to amend a trust deed, where for example a provision brings about consequences which in the opinion of the court, the founder of a trust did not contemplate or foresee and which hampers the achievement of the object of the founder, prejudices the interest of the beneficiaries or is in conflict with the public interest.

Accordingly, in a recent High Court decision, it was found that a variation of the provisions of a testamentary trust (brought about by agreement between the trustee and the beneficiaries) was valid. Despite the fact that a trust is of testamentary origin, it does not prevent the trustees and beneficiaries from agreeing to an amendment. The court further stated that if the testamentary trust also confers on a trustee the power to decide when to terminate the trust, it also implies that the trustee has the power to amend the trust deed.

The provisions of the Act which requires a trustee to, in exercising his powers, act with the care, diligence and skill which can reasonably be expected of a person who manages the affairs of another, still applies, and should a trustee decide to amend the provisions of the trust, the trustee will need to exercise his authority in accordance with the Act.

It is therefore possible that your trust provisions may be varied after your death. We would advise to enlist the help of your estate planner to ensure that your testamentary trust provisions are appropriately wide to provide sufficient scope to the trustees to manage (and if necessary amend) the trust in changing circumstances in a manner that is acceptable to you.